89 Surefire Sales Email Subject Lines: Hook Prospects First Time

Sales Email Subject Lines: Hook Prospects First Time

Feel as if you’re firing off thousands of valuable emails to prospects, just to never get a response? About one-third of people decide to open an email just by looking at the subject line. So, it’s important to find a catchy email subject line.

Prospects are constantly prioritizing their time, especially when it comes to their emails. You need to start taking things more seriously. This is because there is a daily influx of messages from businesses and email marketers that professionals get. Getting noticed in this crowded space is important.

Learn how to do exactly that, alongside what makes a compelling email subject line for sales below.

In a rush? Don’t forget to copy and paste one of our 89 best sales email subject lines. Doing so can increase your open rates and, hopefully, your responses!

89 Surefire Sales Email Subject Lines

Why Is It Important to Get Email Subject Lines for Sales Right?

If your email subject line for sales is weak, uninteresting, or irrelevant to your prospect, they will ignore or delete it. They will not even bother opening it.

Think of your own email inbox; how many emails have you deleted or flagged as spam before reading the message? Likely a great deal. 

“On the average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy. When you have written your headline, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.” 

David Ogilvy, Copywriter

The subject line of your email is crucial as it’s the first thing your prospects see. It also affects their impressions of you. Additionally, it impacts their perception of what you’re offering.

How they respond in that first moment either makes or breaks your chances of connecting with them. And your chance to solve their challenges with your product or service.

But what can you do when the open email rate across most industries is only a somewhat unsurprising 21%?

You first learn what makes a good email subject line for sales: 

How Do You Grab Attention in a Sales Email Subject Line?

A good sales email subject line should reflect the email’s content. It should also catch the reader’s attention and make them want to open and interact with the message.

They’re also:

Clear and Specific

Your subject line should clearly communicate what your email is about. 

Avoid vague or generic subject lines that don’t indicate what the recipient can expect to find in the email. 

Your subject line should quickly convey what you’re selling, who it’s for, and the benefits it offers in just five seconds.

Relevant to the Prospect

To give value to your potential customer, know their priorities. They only value what they will gain from your offer.

Why should they, or anyone for that fact, open this email? 

That’s why you must be as clear and concise as possible about your value. 

Attention-Grabbing

You want your subject line to stand out in your prospect’s inbox and catch their attention. 

To grab attention and make them open the email, use humor, mystery, or a question mark to pique curiosity.

The interest varies and depends on what your prospect values. Therefore, you may need to experiment with different approaches. This will help you determine what works best for you.

You can get prospects interested by using a current news story, statistic, question, or asking for help.

Regardless of your chosen angle, it must centre around the prospect (And their problems) rather than your offering.

Concise

Shorter subject lines tend to perform better than longer ones. 

Your subject line should be no more than 3-5 words, or at most, 6-10 words.

Accurate

The content of your email should align with your subject line. 

Don’t use a misleading or clickbaity subject line to get someone to open your email. 

Using lots of emojis, dollar signs, and exclamation marks can get attention, but be careful not to annoy people.

Or misjudge their knowledge by implying things you can’t provide and making false claims. It hurts your reputation with the prospect and their company. 

This will harm your credibility and make the recipient less likely to respond to your future emails.

Keyword-friendly

People often check old emails by searching for the keyword that stood out to them.

You’ll be able to persuade potential customers to do what you want, like replying, meeting, or buying your product.

Mobile-friendly

Considering only 1 in 5 email campaigns are mobile-friendly, your first contact with prospects is likely through their phone.

This is why it’s important to make sure your sales email subject line works well on mobile.

Don’t attempt to use any email glyphs that only work via browser or use too many images that fail to load. 

This is because different mobile and tablet devices show varying characters in your subject line.

Overall, the general rule of thumb is to limit them to around 25 characters or one to four words.

Infographic on a checklist for creating engaging sales email subject lines

How Do You Write a Catchy Sales Email?

What am I selling?

Yes, you know what your company is offering – but what is the value to your prospect? Just offering a new product or promotion isn’t sufficient – potential customers want to know how it benefits them.

Who am I selling to? 

Write your sales email subject line as if you were your prospect, put yourselves in their shoes – what do they need? Why do they need it? What’s stopping them from achieving this?

Are they already familiar with me or my company?

When making a first impression, it is important to avoid making mistakes in sales email subject lines. These mistakes include making false claims or assuming that the recipient wants to connect with you.

Why should they want to open my email?

The subject line makes people open the email, but the body is what motivates them to act on what you’re offering.

Would I open, respond or delete an email with this subject line if it appeared in MY inbox?

How many emails do you receive and delete daily? Chances are it’s quite a few – so get back into your prospect’s shoes and think subjectively. Would I open this email? If you’re not interested, why would your prospect be?

Also read:

Infographic on the 5 questions that you can ask yourself to help you create sales email subject lines that work

8 Best Subject Lines for Sales Emails

Email subject lines have many benefits based on your goals for reaching prospects. Discover the types of emails below:

Direct

A direct approach is often the best. Get attention by mentioning a problem your prospect has in the subject line. This will make your email stand out.

Simple sales email subject lines let prospects decide if they’re interested, giving them power from the begining.

For example: [Pain-point] making you [emotion]? I can help.

Curiosity-driven

Our brains naturally notice when things are incomplete, unexpected, or missing information. A natural way to pique your prospect’s attention and curiosity.

Be careful though, you must keep your promise in the email or you will lose credibility and appear amateurish.

For example: Congratulations, [Prospect first name]!

Pain-centric

Ignoring a problem is hard, especially when it’s right in front of you. That’s why subject lines revolving around your prospect’s pain points are naturally perfect for standing out in the crowd.

People will always read an email if it could solve their problem, but you need to mention it first.

For example: [Pain point]: There’s a better way 

Scarcity & Urgency – Last Chance

The fear of missing out is a common motivator. Limited time and availabilkity make people act fast.

For example: The clock’s ticking.

Cold

When reaching out to potential customers, use subject lines that solve their main problems and grab their attention. That way, you’re getting straight to the point and hopefully intriguing them.

For example: [Number] tips for [pain point]

Follow-up

You’ve just got a deal moving; now you need to stay top of mind with prospects without being overwhelming.

Follow-up subject lines are important for keeping the conversation going.

For example: Any feedback?

No response

It happens—a lot. Your potential customers may go away for a while, and that’s fine. But you should be able to bring them back or finish the conversation.

No response subject lines are a perfect tool for deciding whether to keep trying or let them go.

For example: [Prospect name]?

Meeting requests

You want to meet with your prospect, but why should they meet with you?

Use short and clear subject lines when asking for a meeting to improve your chances of getting a yes.

That way, prospects spend more time deciding whether to attend or not rather than wondering what you want.

For example: Meeting invite: [Date] – [Time]

89 Best Sales Email Subject Lines to Increase Open Rates

Simply copy and paste any one of these sales email subject lines and increase your open rates and, hopefully, your responses!

Direct Sales Email Subject Lines

  • (Prospect name), quick call [day]?

This subject line is good because it’s simple and personal. Using the person’s name and proposing a fast call on a specific day shows urgency and personalized interaction.

  • (Prospect name), have time to discuss [challenge]?

This subject line directly addresses a challenge the prospect might be facing, showing that you’ve done your homework. It asks them to engage in a discussion, making it clear that you are offering a solution that fits what they need.

  • Appreciate any response, (Prospect name)

The subject line is nice and simple, showing thanks and saying you’re open to talking. Friendly and makes the person feel welcome to reply.

  • Connect?

This subject line is short and straight to the point, asking the person to connect. Good because it’s simple and makes you curious, making you want to open the email to learn more about why you’re connecting.

  • [Pain-point] making you [emotion]? I can help.

This subject line discusses a specific problem and connects it to how the person might feel. It grabs their attention because it promises to help, showing that the sender knows what’s going on and can fix things.

  • How to solve [challenge prospect faces]

This subject line is simple and gives a solution-focused idea. It catches your interest by discussing about a problem and hinting that the email has a solution inside.

  • A [benefit your solution provides] for [prospect’s company]

This subject line is excellent because it highlights a specific good thing for the person’s company. It discusses things that they value and makes them want to check out how your solution can make their business better.

  • A better way to solve [challenge]

This subject line hints that the person can do better in dealing with a problem. It makes you curious by offering a different solution, making you want to open the email and learn more.

  • [Prospect name], let’s talk about [solution]?

Including the person’s name and discussing a specific solution makes the email feel more personal and relevant. It makes the reader think about the solution you’re suggesting.

  • [Prospect name], can we connect over a quick call [date]?

This subject line makes it feel like a personal email by using the person’s name and suggesting a specific date for a quick call. It also provides a clear next step. It makes scheduling easier and shows that you’re committed to their time.

  • [Prospect name], do you have [timeframe] to discuss [solution]?

This subject line is great because it makes things personal by using the person’s name and asking when they’re available. It shows that you value their time and suggest a focused discussion about finding a solution.

  • Quick question, [Prospect name]?

The subject line is intriguing and encourages the prospect to open the email by posing a quick question. It sparks curiosity and sets the stage for a brief and engaging interaction.

  • [Prospect name], I have an idea for [prospect’s company]!

Using the prospect’s name and suggesting the email as an idea for their company generates interest. It suggests taking charge and positions the sender as someone with valuable insights for the prospect’s business.

Curiosity Driven Sales Email Subject Lines

  • More wins inside for (prospect’s company)

This subject line sparks curiosity by hinting at the possibility of more victories for the prospect’s company. It asks the prospect to open the email and learn about potential wins, appealing to their desire for success.

  • [Odd number] companies solved  ______ with us!

Adding an odd number makes it interesting. It hints that lots of companies fixed a problem using what the sender offers, making the prospect want to know more.

  • Did you know?

This subject line plays on the recipient’s curiosity by hinting at undisclosed information. It encourages the prospect to open the email to discover what interesting or valuable information awaits them.

  • Can you help me?

By asking for help, this subject line makes them feel like you’re working together. It makes prospects curious and want to open the email to see what kind of help is needed and if they can pitch in.

  • [Prospect name], guess what?

Personalizing the subject line with the prospect’s name adds a friendly touch. Using “guess what?” makes people curious about exciting information or news being shared, creating a playful atmosphere.

  • [Prospect name], have you heard about [solution]?

Using the prospect’s name makes it personal. The subject line grabs their interest by promising intriguing information about a solution they may not know about. This makes them curious and eager to learn more.

  • [Odd number] reasons why [prospect’s company] needs [solution]

The odd number makes it interesting. It also shows that there are good and clear reasons why the prospect’s company would like the solution. It makes them curious to know what these reasons are.

  • [Prospect name], can you guess how much [benefit] our solution provides?

Personalizing the subject line with the prospect’s name adds a personal touch. Asking a question and promising a benefit will make them curious. This curiosity encourages them to open the email to find the answer.

  • [Prospect name], are you curious about [solution]?

Addressing the prospect by name and directly asking if they are curious creates a sense of personal connection. It makes prospects curious and wants to open the email to learn more about what is being offered.

  • [Prospect name], have you seen our latest success story?

This makes it personal by using the prospect’s name and promising a recent success story. This makes them want to open the email because it discusses real success and how the sender’s solution worked for other people.

Pain-Centric Sales Email Subject Lines

  • Struggling with [pain point]? I can help.

This subject line discusses an exact problem, connecting with what the prospect is going through. The offer to help suggests there’s a way to fix it, making it interesting for someone dealing with that issue.

  • Fix your [pain-point] in [x] [days,weeks,years]

This subject line hints that you can fix a problem promptly. The mention of a specific time makes it feel urgent, making prospects think about solving the issue fast.

  • Key challenges in implementing [solution]

This subject line discusses the problems your prospects might have when trying a solution. It shows that you know about these issues and want to help your prospects get through them.

  • [Company name] X [Product Name] = [Benefit]

This subject line is like a math problem. It shows that your company and product can solve a specific problem. It makes it easy to understand how the solution connects to the benefit your prospects get.

  • [Pain point]: There’s a better way 

This subject line addresses a problem and says there’s a better solution. It makes prospects curious because it suggests a way that works better for dealing with their challenges.

  • [Prospect name], struggling with [pain point]?

This subject line uses personalization by mentioning the prospect’s name. Asking someone directly about a problem makes them think about the email as a solution for their specific issue.

  • [Prospect name], are you tired of [pain point]?

By asking if the prospect is tired of a specific pain point, this subject line taps into their emotions. It helps when your prospect is feeling frustrated or tired, making them more open to finding a solution that brings relief.

  • [Prospect name], let’s solve [pain point] together.

This subject line hints that you and the prospect might work together to solve their problem. It makes them feel like they have a partner and support in handling their challenges.

  • [Prospect name], can we help you overcome [pain point]?

Personalizing the subject line with the prospect’s name and offering help creates a supportive tone. The email discusses a problem the prospect has and how you can help. This makes the prospect want to read the email to learn more about the help provided.

  • [Prospect name], imagine a world without [pain point].

This subject line asks the prospect to picture a life without their current problem. It makes them think about something better. It makes them feel good and want to see how your solution can turn this vision into reality.

Scarcity & Urgency Sales Email Subject Lines

  • Don’t get left behind [name]

This subject line creates a sense of urgency like the prospect might miss out on something great. The use of the prospect’s name personalizes the message, making it feel more immediate and relevant to them.

  • I’d hate to see you miss out…

This subject line taps into the emotional aspect by expressing concern about the prospect missing out. It plays on a sense of potential regret, encouraging the prospect to act so they don’t feel regret later.

  • You’ve still got time…

By stating that there’s still time, this subject line suggests a limited window for action. It combines urgency with a reassuring tone, giving the prospect one last chance to act before it’s too late.

  • Last chance to solve [pain-point]

This subject line is clearly saying it’s the last chance to fix a specific pain point. It highlights urgency while connecting the prospect’s problem with the offered solution.

  • Time’s running out -solved [pain-point] yet?

This subject line creates urgency and asks directly about solving a problem. It makes the prospect think about where they’re at with the issue and if the offered solution can help.

  • The clock’s ticking.

This short and simple subject line is like a loud reminder that time is running out. It makes your prospects feel like they need to hurry up and act before it’s too late.

  • [Prospect name], last chance to take advantage of our offer.

This subject line uses your prospect’s name to make it personal. It creates an urgency to seize an offer now. It compels the prospect to act before the chance goes away.

  • [Prospect name], act fast before [offer] expires!

This subject line uses your prospect’s name again to make it personal. It also urges them to act fast before a special offer ends.

  • [Prospect name], limited time to solve [pain point].

This subject line uses your prospect’s name to make it personal and tells them that they don’t have a lot of time left to fix a problem. It makes them want to act on their specific issue quickly.

  • [Prospect name], don’t miss out on [benefit]!

This subject line talks directly to your prospect by using their name. It highlights the benefits that they might miss if they don’t act now. It makes them want to avoid missing out on those good things.

  • [Prospect name], urgent: [solution] can solve [pain point] now!

This subject line uses their name to make it personal. It highlights to them that the solution offered is not just good, but needs to be done right away. It makes them feel like they have to fix their problem quickly.

Cold Sales Email Subject Lines

  • [Name], [Question]?

This subject line talks directly to the prospect by using their name and poses a question to them. It feels personal and It encourages a response, so most people are likely to reply.

  • [Number] tips for [pain point]

Giving a specific number of tips makes the value clear and concise. It suggests that the email contains helpful information to fix a pain point, making it more likely for the prospect to open and read.

  • Can I help?

This subject line is simple and direct. It cuts to the chase and conveys a willingness to assist, creating a friendly and approachable tone. It encourages the prospect to open the email to learn more about the offered help.

  • We have [Insert Common Fact] in common

Highlighting something you both share establishes a connection between you and the prospect. It piques their curiosity and interest, prompting them to open it. They want to learn more about the shared factor and understand its significance.

  • [Prospect name], have you considered [solution]?

This subject line feels like you are talking directly to the prospect by using their name. It asks if they’ve thought about a particular solution, making them curious to know more.

  • [Prospect name], let’s chat about [solution]!

Personalizing with the prospect’s name and using casual language like “let’s chat” creates a friendly and inviting tone. It suggests a conversation rather than a formal pitch, making the prospect more likely to open the email.

  • [Prospect name], can I help you solve [pain point]?

This subject line talks to the prospect by using their name and offers to help with an exact problem. By using the prospect by name and highlighting a pain point, it hints that you have a tailored solution. It makes the prospect want to open the email to learn more. encouraging the prospect to open the email for more details.

  • [Prospect name], a new solution for [pain point].

This subject line talks directly to the person by using their name again. The subject line suggests there’s a new solution for a pain point. It creates a sense of novelty and prompts the prospect to open the email to learn more.

  • [Prospect name], would you like to learn more about [solution]?

By directly asking if the prospect wants to learn more about a solution, this subject line instantly engages them. The invitation makes them curious and urges them to explore further.

  • Quick question [Name]…

This subject line talks to the prospect personally and keeps it quick and simple. It makes them curious so it increases the likelihood of them opening the email to find the question.

Follow-up Sales Email Subject Lines

  • Your next steps

This subject line suggests a progression in the prospect’s journey. It compels the reader to open the email to discover the next steps or decisions

  • [Number] options for getting started

Giving a certain number of choices makes things clear and organized. It shows that the prospects can pick what works best for them, making them want to open the email and check out the options.

  • Quick call — [date & time]?

This subject line suggests doing a specific action, like a quick call, and it even tells the prospect when. It helps them decide easily because it’s clear and tells them what to do. That’s why it works well.

  • Any feedback?

This subject line asks the prospect for their thoughts. It works because it makes them feel like their opinion is important and encourages them to respond and share what they think.

  • I thought about what you said…

Referencing a past chat or talk adds a personal feel. It shows that you have been thinking about them and that you are trying to make a connection with them. It makes them curious to open the email and see your thoughts.

  • What will it take?

The subject line asks the prospect to consider what you must do to move forward. It works because it makes them curious. It gets them thinking about what they must do to make progress, making them want to open the email.

  • [Prospect name], following up on our conversation.

Talking directly to the prospect by using their name makes it personal. It shows that you are keeping the conversation going from before, making the person want to open the email to see what’s up.

  • [Prospect name], did you have any further questions?

Talking to the prospect by using their name makes it personal. This subject line shows that you want to chat with them by asking if they have more questions. It makes them want to talk back and share what they’re thinking.

  • [Prospect name], checking in on your progress.

Talking to the prospect by using their name makes it personal. This subject line shows your supportive approach by checking in on them. It makes them want to open the email and share what’s going on.

  • [Prospect name], here are some next steps for [solution].

Talking to the prospect by using their name makes it personal. By outlining the next steps, it gives a clear and actionable message. It makes them feel guided to open the email to learn more.

  • [Prospect name], let’s schedule a follow-up call.

Talking to the prospect by using their name makes it personal. This subject line suggests a clear call-to-action, making the prospect want to open the email to set up the call.

No Response Sales Email Subject Lines

  • Last time, I promise

This subject line conveys a last call for a conversation between you and the prospect. It suggests that this is the final attempt to connect which appeals to the prospect’s curiosity. This makes them want to open the email to see the offering.

  • Shameless last attempt!

The use of “shameless” adds a touch of humor and self-awareness. It’s like admitting that you are being bold with this last try. It may intrigue the prospect to open the email to see what you have to say in this “last attempt”.

  • (Prospect name)?

Using your prospect’s name in the subject again makes it personal. The question mark creates a sense of curiosity and makes them wonder about the content of the email. It potentially encourages them to open and respond.

  • Should I assume?

This subject line is like a little mystery. It makes your prospect wonder what assumption you are referring to. It gets them curious enough to want to open the email to learn more.

  • If you change your mind…

This subject line leaves the door open for the prospect to reconsider. It conveys a polite and patient tone, giving them space to think and come back whenever they’re ready.

  • RE: The last email

The use of “RE:” implies a response to a previous email, creating a sense of flow. Referencing it as “the last email” adds a touch of finality. It makes them think about their past conversation with you and maybe open the email to see and engage with the content.

  • Is this goodbye?

The question creates a sense of uncertainty and may trigger the prospect’s curiosity if there is a farewell message. It makes the prospect want to open the email to understand the context.

  • Goodbye, [Prospect’s Name]

This subject line takes a direct approach by saying goodbye. It prompts the prospect to open the email to understand the reason behind the farewell message.

  • Time to part ways?

Similar to the previous ones, it introduces the idea of parting ways. It creates a sense of finality and makes them want to open the email to learn more about the decision.

  • I’m moving on

It shows that you have decided to move on and signals a change in direction. It makes the prospect want to open the email to understand why you are moving on. They may want to see if there’s an opportunity to reconnect.

  • [Prospect name], is everything okay?’

This subject line expresses concern for the prospect. It adds a human touch and makes them want to open the email to address any potential issues or concerns.

  • [Prospect name], hope to hear from you soon.

It combines personalization with a positive tone. It shows that you’re optimistic and want to connect with the prospect. It makes them want to open the email with the expectation of a positive message.

  • [Prospect name], last chance to take advantage of our offer.

The use of “last chance” adds urgency, signaling that this is a final opportunity. It encourages the prospect to open the email to ensure they don’t miss out on the offer.

  • [Prospect name], are you still interested in [solution]?

It directly relates to the prospect’s desire for a solution. It makes them want to open the email to either confirm their interest or to explain their current stance.

  • [Prospect name], let me know if you change your mind.

It maintains a polite and open-ended tone. It makes the prospect want to open the email and reply if they’ve decided differently.

  • It’s not you- it’s me.

This subject line adds a touch of humor and uses a classic breakup phrase. It may intrigue the prospect to open the email and discover the context behind the light-hearted message.

Meeting Request Sales Email Subject Lines

  • [Number] minutes this [Day]?

It suggests a short and specific time commitment. It makes it easier for the prospect to consider the short meeting. They may think about opening the email to see the details of the proposed meeting.

  • [Prospect name] + [Your company name]: [Date]

It aims to grab attention and personalize the invitation by combining the prospect’s name and your company name. It provides clear essential information, prompting the prospect to open the email.

  • Meeting invite: [Date] – [Time]

The subject line is straightforward and to the point. It relays the purpose and timing of the meeting which makes it easy for the prospect to understand. They may consider opening the email for more details.

  • [Prospect name], let’s schedule a meeting for [date & time]?

It personalizes the invitation by combining the prospect’s name with a clear call to action. The prospect gets involved in the scheduling process and will want to open the email for further information.

  • [Prospect name], can we connect for [number] minutes this [day]?

It suggests a short and definite time obligation, making it more appealing to the prospect. It combines personalization with a clear ask, encouraging the prospect to open the email to consider the meeting request.

  • [Prospect name], a meeting invite for [date & time].

It clearly says that there is a meeting invite for a specific date and time. The subject line is clear and to the point which makes the prospect want to open the email and access the meeting details.

  • [Prospect name], let’s set a time to discuss [solution].

Personalizing the subject line makes it personal and the mention of a discussion for a solution entices the prospect. It creates a clear purpose for the meeting and prompts them to open the email to learn more.

  • [Prospect name], meeting request: [date] – [time].

It combines a personal feel with clear information about the meeting request. It communicates the purpose, date, and time, encouraging the prospect to open the email for more details.

Discover A New Way to Generate Leads

Like blood to a body, a full sales pipeline is necessary for your business to survive. The thing is, prospecting has evolved, and old methods just aren’t useful anymore. 

Join Prospecting Power and learn how to ensure your customer acquisition strategy is creative, persistent and, most importantly, generates real results.

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